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Overview - Engineering

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Engineering

Watermaster continues to develop the Optimum Basin Management Program (OBMP). Upon completion of the OBMP, specific tasks and activities were assigned to Watermaster's legal and engineering services to support Watermaster in the implementation of the OBMP. The OBMP consists of nine key elements covering a wide range of water activity in the Basin.


These elements are:

Program Element 1 – Comprehensive Monitoring

This groundwater monitoring program consists of an initial survey followed by annual monitoring efforts to collect water quality data from production and monitoring wells. This multi-task effort includes groundwater level monitoring; groundwater quality monitoring; production monitoring; surface water quality and quantity monitoring; and well construction, abandonment, and destruction monitoring.

For background information and long term monitoring trends, see the “State of the Basin Report – 2006” dated July 2007 which includes data through the end of CY 2006. For current information, see “Status Report 2007-1” for the period January-June 2007 and “Status Report 2007-2” for the period July – December 2007.

Program Element 2 – Comprehensive Recharge

This element involves the planning, design, construction, and operation of ground water recharge facilities, such as pipeline and channel turnouts, recharge basins, and SCADA monitoring systems. The facilities are intended to balance long term groundwater production with recharge of storm, imported, and recycled water.

For background information, see Section 3.4 Artificial Recharge of the “State of the Basin Report – 2006” dated July 2007. For current construction and operational information, see “Status Report 2007 – 1” for the period January – June 2007 and “Status Report 2007 – 2” for the period July – December 2007. In addition, CBWM updates a monthly recharge spreadsheet which documents the amount of storm, imported, and recycled water recharged during the prior month and fiscal year to date.

Program Element 3 - Water Supply Plan for Impaired Areas

and

Program Element 5 – Regional Supplemental Water Program

These elements have been combined since the plan is to expand the capacities of the Chino I and Chino II Desalters and their associated well fields so as to increase potable supplies, maintain groundwater production in an area of rapid urbanization, and remediate legacy contaminant plumes. The desalter plant expansions will continue to discharge brine through the SARI line, thereby removing salt from the basin and enabling the recharge basins to accept recycled water.

For background information on the legacy plumes, see section 4.3 – Groundwater Quality in Chino Basin of the “State of the Basin Report – 2006”, dated July 2007. For current information on the expansion of the Chino I and Chino II Desalters, see “Status Report 2007 – 1” for the period January – June 2007 and “Status Report 2007 – 2” for the period July – December 2007.

Program Element 4 – Groundwater Management Plan for MZ-1

The purpose of this element is to develop a long–term management plan to minimize subsidence and fissuring in MZ-1. In an effort to balance the production and recharge in MZ-1, CBWM released the “Management Zone 1 Subsidence Management Plan” in October 2007. Further information on the development of a long term plan can be found in “Status Report 2007 – 1” for the period January – June 2007 and “Status Report 2007 – 2” for the period July – December 2007.

Program Element 6 – Cooperative Program to Improve Basin Management

and

Program Element 7 – A Salt Management Program

Program Element 6 has evolved into a cooperative effort with the RWQCB – SAR to investigate and/or remediate the legacy plumes found in the Chino Basin. The major plumes currently being investigated are the VOC plume south of Ontario International Airport, the Kaiser Plume, the Stringfellow perchlorate plume, and the Chino Airport VOC plume. Remedial efforts are currently underway at the GE Flat Iron plume, the GE Test Cell plume, and the Stringfellow Site itself. A request for No Further Action (NFA) is pending for the PCE Plume at the California Institute for Men.

Program Element 7 consists of TDS and nitrogen monitoring of both groundwater and surface water pursuant to the 2004 Basin Plan Amendment. Quarterly reports summarizing data collected are submitted to the RWQCB, along with an annual report in April discussing the prior CY results.

For background information and long term monitoring trends, see Section 4.3 of Groundwater Quality in Chino Basin in the “State of the Basin Report – 2006” , dated July 2007, which includes data through the end of CY 2006. For current information see “Status Report 2007 – 1” for the period January – June 2007, and “Status Report 2007 – 2” for the period July – December 2007.

Program Element 8 – Groundwater Storage Management Plan

and

Program Element 9 – A Storage and Recovery Program

The facilities required to produce groundwater in the event of an MWDSC “take” are nearing completion, and as of December 31, 2007, about 88,000 AF had been stored in MWDSC’s account (which allows up to 100,000 AF of storage). Negotiations are ongoing with MWDSC to increase storage capacity to 150,000 AF and with other So Cal utilities to enter into similar agreements. The 2007 CBWM Groundwater Model will be used to evaluate the effects of additional storage agreements on the operation of the basin. Details can be found in report, “2007 CBWM Groundwater Model Documentation and Evaluation of the Peace II Project Description” dated November 2007. For more current information, see “Status Report 2007 – 1” for activities in the period January – June 2007 and “Status Report 2007 – 2” for the period July – December 2007.



 

The Chino Basin covers over 220 square miles and provides water for over 700,000 residents. The Basin storage capacity is between 5 and 7 million acre-feet, and the safe yield from over 800 active wells is more than 140,000 acre-feet a year. The Basin is strategically located amid one of the population centers and major growth areas of Southern California.



Map Illustrations Technical Presentations


Click here to review graphic illustrations and important points of the Watermaster activities.


The recharge element is one of the main components of the OBMP. The development and implementation of the recharge plan is to increase recharge capacity of the Basin and accumulate greater quantities of water made accessible to producer and consumers.


This illustration (right) shows how a recharge capacity of over 150,000 acre‑feet of water per year would store:

  • Excess imported water in wet years
  • High quality stormwater
  • Recycled water
Click to enlarge!

click image to enlarge


The resources listed above not only increase the water supply but improve groundwater quality and lower the cost of the Desalter treatment process.



The Desalter production process is part of the recharge improvement project to capture additional stormwater. The Desalters were set up for treatment processing of up to 20 million gallons of water a day with a high volume of dissolved solids and nitrate levels. This production will increase local water supplies by restoration of contaminated water through the treatment process, lower groundwater levels and prevent water spills in the Santa River or other downstream communities.

 

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Chino Basin Watermaster 9641 San Bernardino Road, Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730
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